21.04.2018
FBI isn't done nabbing Trump advisors at airports: Nigel Farage associate brought in at Logan

FBI isn't done nabbing Trump advisors at airports: Nigel Farage associate brought in at Logan

Ted Malloch is not a name that has appeared often in connection with the investigation into the Trump campaign’s connections to Russia. However, Malloch is an associate of both Roger Stone and Nigel Farage, was Donald Trump’s first choice as ambassador to the EU, and in an interview with the BBC stated that he had been “extensively consulted”  by Donald Trump during the presidential campaign.

Malloch, who now lives in London and often appears in the UK press as a Trump surrogate, was visiting the US on Wednesday when the FBI intercepted him at Boston’s Logan Airport.

A controversial London-based academic with close ties to Nigel Farage has been detained by the FBI upon arrival in the US and issued a subpoena to testify before Robert Mueller, the special counsel who is investigating possible collusion between the Trump campaign and the Kremlin.

Malloch’s bid to become a US ambassador, which included numerous public appearances and self-promotion on his part, was scuttled when it turned out his biography was sprinkled with several self-aggrandizing lies. And also because he turned out to be more than a little bit insane. Trump might not be bothered by such things, but European leaders reacted negatively to Malloch’s jaw-dropping statements and false credentials, so his appointment was pulled.

In a statement sent to the Guardian, Malloch, who described himself as a policy wonk and defender of Trump, said the FBI also asked him about his relationship with Roger Stone, the Republican strategist, and whether he had ever visited the Ecuadorian embassy in London, where the Wikileaks founder Julian Assange has resided for nearly six years.

Malloch was startled to find that the FBI agents had done their homework. And they were serious.

In a detailed statement about the experience, which he described as bewildering and intimidating at times, Malloch said the federal agents who stopped him and separated him from his wife “seemed to know everything about me” and warned him that lying to the FBI was a felony.

The same day Malloch was pulled in for questioning, the Ecadorian Embassy cut Assange’s communications, reducing his ability to continue running WikiLeaks from the protection of his room in the embassy, where he has been hiding from extradition for over five years. Whether that move is connected to the questioning of Malloch isn’t clear. But the timing is interesting.